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Brushes & Painting knives

Which brushes are suitable for acrylic colours?

Brushes made of firmer types of hair are the most commonly used for acrylic painting.

  • Hog hair brushes can hold a lot of thick paint, but have a brush stroke that is too inaccurate for working in fine detail. What's more, with water hog hair brushes become a little less resilient.
  • Synthetic (selected filament) brushes are not affected by water and are suitable for both thick and strongly diluted paint as well as fine details.

Acrylic colour brushes have a long handle so that sufficient distance can be maintained from the painting. 

How can brushes best be cleaned?

Brushes can best be cleaned in the solvent that is also used for the paint. Depending on the type of paint, this can be water or white spirit.

  • Aquarel, gouache, poster paint, ecoline, water mixable oil colours and acrylic colours are cleaned with water.
  • Oil colours or alkyd with white spirit.
What brushes are best used with Cobra colours?

For Cobra colours you can use the same brushes as for regular oil colours. There are also brushes of the Cobra brand. These are brushes of ‘Selected Filament’ hair: resilient synthetic hairs. You can also use animal hair brushes, such as Kolinsky, red sable, ox hair and hog bristle.

Which brushes are suitable for oil colours?

The choice of brush depends on the painting technique.

Hog bristle brushes are most commonly used for oil paint. The firmer hog bristle brushes can hold a lot of thick paint, but have a brush stroke that is too inaccurate for working in fine detail.

For detailed work and glazing techniques, sable hair is highly suited.

For all techniques, however, brushes made of synthetic fibres (selected filament) are a good alternative.

Oil colour brushes have a long handle so that sufficient distance can be maintained from the painting.